Course:  Latin II - Ecce Romani II

Teacher - Edward J. Golden, Ph.D.

                                      

 

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Ancient Roman Insula

           
   
Learning
        Objectives:
       
  • Students will be able to recognize passive verb forms in context.
    LII.1,6

  • Students will be able to sort out words that begin with "qu-".  LII.1.,6

  • Students will able to tabulate indefinite adjectives and inter-
    rogative pronouns.
    LII.5,6

  • Students will learn about the Roman Insula. LII.3
       

  Lesson Plan:  Chapter XXIX Going to the Market 

Dies: Class Work/Homework Page(s)
     
Dies I. Grammar: Indefinite Adjectives  & Interrog. Pronouns p. 13-15
  Translate Story In Class p. 11
  Homework: Learn Charts   p. 14-15
     
Dies II. Chart Quiz:  Indefinite Adjectives/Interrog. Pronouns p. 14-15
  Exercises 29a-c in class p. 11-13
  Homework:  Learn Vocabulary 29 p. 11 +
     
Dies III. Vocabulary Quiz 29 / Complete Exercises 29d-g pp. 13-18
  Roman Life:  Town House and Apartment pp. 16-17
  Homework:  Workbook Activities 29a-e  
     
Dies IV. Review Workbook Exercises/Quiz Prep 29  
  Homework: Prepare for Quiz 29  
     
Dies V. Chapter XXIX Quiz/ Begin Translation 30  
  Homework:  Complete Translation 30 pp. 21-22
     

 

     

Latin II

In Latin II, students develop the ability to comprehend written Latin texts with more complex linguistic structures. The first strand of the Latin Standards of Learning focuses on interpretation of texts because the focus is on comprehension rather than person-to-person communication. Students understand adapted and/or authentic Latin from original sources. To support the development of reading skills, students continue to use and understand some oral Latin and write simple phrases and sentences. Students also learn about the perspectives, practices, and products of the ancient Romans as reflected in areas such as Roman architecture, art, and history. Students compare these cultural and historical elements to their own culture and find examples of the influence of Greco-Roman cultures in their own world. They also compare the effects of the geography of the ancient Roman world and that of the United States on aspects of culture, such as food, dwellings, clothing, and art.

Reading for Understanding

LII.1  The student will understand written Latin texts based on various topics.

1.   Read for information.

2.   Recognize the difference between giving literal meaning and paraphrasing.

3.   Demonstrate expanded knowledge of vocabulary and recognition of additional syntactical structures essential to comprehension.

   

Using Oral and Written Language for Understanding

LII.2   The student will continue to use Latin orally and listen to and write Latin as part of the language-learning process.

1.   Read Latin aloud with consistent pronunciation, meaningful phrase grouping, and appropriate voice inflection.

2.   Initiate and respond appropriately to oral and written questions, statements, and commands.

3.   Compose Latin sentences with expanded vocabulary and structures.
  

Cultural Perspectives, Practices, and Products

LII.3   The student will demonstrate understanding of the perspectives, practices, and products of Roman culture and the ways these cultural aspects are interrelated.

1.   Describe cultural characteristics and behaviors of the Romans, such as marriage and funeral customs, leisure activities, games, entertainment, and meals.

2.   Examine the influence of legendary and historical figures and/or events, such as Cincinnatus, Horatius, and the expulsion of the kings, on Roman perspectives.

3.   Examine the ways geography, history, and major cities, such as Carthage and the Punic Wars, and Athens and Greek culture, influenced the practices and perspectives of the Romans.

4.   Demonstrate knowledge of the architectural styles, art forms, and artifacts of the Romans as evidence of their cultural perspectives.

5.   Examine important myths of Greco-Roman origin, such as Ulysses and craftiness, and Mars as patron god of Rome, and their influence on Roman perspectives.

6.   Participate in simulated cultural activities, such as family celebrations, sports and entertainment, and festivals.
   
   

Making Connections through Language

LII.4  The student will use information acquired in the study of Latin and information acquired in other subject areas to reinforce one another.

1.   Give examples of the influence of the Latin language and Roman culture in other subject areas, such as the contributions of Roman architects to the world.

2.   Compare and contrast information acquired in other subject areas to topics discussed in Latin class, such as people and events of the Roman world.
   
   

Cultural and Linguistic Comparisons

LII.5  The student will demonstrate understanding of cultural similarities and differences between the Roman world and the United States.

1.   Compare and contrast traditions and customs of ancient Rome and the United States, such as those related to marriage, funerals, leisure activities, games, entertainment, and meals.

2.   Compare and contrast the legends and history of ancient Rome with those of the United States, such as Cincinnatus and George Washington.

3.   Compare and contrast the effects of the geography of the ancient Roman world and of the United States on aspects of culture, such as food, dwellings, clothing, and art.
   
   

 

LII.6    The student will develop a deeper understanding of the English language through study of the Latin language.

1.   Expand knowledge of English vocabulary by noting the relationship of Latin words to their English derivatives.

2.   Compare and contrast structural patterns of Latin and English.    

3.   Compare the use of idiomatic expressions in Latin and English.
      


Communication across Communities

LII.7  The student will apply knowledge of the Latin language and Greco-Roman culture in opportunities beyond the classroom setting for recreational, educational, and occupational purposes.

1.   Present examples of the Latin language and Greco-Roman culture evident in media, entertainment, and occupations.

2.   Use resources, such as individuals and organizations in the community or accessible through the Internet, to reinforce cultural understanding of the Greco-Roman world.

   

  

 

For further information contact:

Edward J. Golden, Ph.D.

WJCC Public Schools

Williamsburg, VA 23185

goldene@wjcc.k12.va.us